Tea Party of Scottsdale, AZ
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Fourth of July: The First Anniversary (1777)

On the first anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, Congress adjourned for the day and dined with military officers and various dignitaries.  British deserters and the Hessian band, taken at the Battle of Trenton, also joined the festivities.  A naval parade with cannon fire began the day’s celebration.  During the evening, candles were placed in windows, bells were rung and fireworks were set off.  John Adams wrote to his daughter, “I was amazed at the universal joy and alacrity [cheerfulness] that was discovered, and at the brilliancy and splendor of every part of this joyful exhibition.”

The Pennsylvania Evening Post reported the event: “Yesterday the 4th of July, being 

the Anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America, was celebrated in this city [Philadelphia] with demonstrations of joy and festivity. About noon all the armed ships and galleys in the river were drawn up before the city, dressed in the gayest manner, with the colors of the United States and streamers displayed. At one o'clock, the yards [timbers with sails attached] being properly manned, they began the celebration of the day by a discharge of thirteen cannon from each of the ships… in honor of the Thirteen United States…

After dinner a number of toasts were drank, all breathing independence, and a generous love of liberty, and commemorating the memories of those brave and worthy patriots who gallantly exposed their lives, and fell gloriously in defense of freedom and the righteous cause of their country. Each toast was followed by a discharge of artillery and small arms, and a suitable piece of music by the Hessian band…

The evening was closed with the ringing of bells, and at night there was a grand exhibition of fireworks, which began and concluded with thirteen rockets on the Commons, and the city was beautifully illuminated. Everything was conducted with the greatest order and decorum, and the face of joy and gladness was universal.”  Pennsylvania Evening Post, July 5, 1777

James Still (July 2017), RetraceOurSteps.com

“Thus may the 4th of July, that glorious and ever memorable day, be celebrated through America, by the sons of freedom, from age to age till time shall be no more.”  Pennsylvania Evening Post, July 5, 1777

 

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published this page in Home 2017-06-30 15:52:28 -0600