Tea Party of Scottsdale, AZ
Our mission is to attract, educate, organize, and mobilize our fellow citizens to secure public policy consistent with our three core values: Personal Freedom, Economic Freedom and a Debt-Free Future


 

 

Scottsdale City Council

Scottsdale City Council Report, April 20, by Doug Reed

PA160153.jpgWe have our twice yearly Adopt-A-Road event coming up Saturday, the day after tomorrow. For the past several years, Tea Party Scottsdale has “adopted” Chaparral Road between Pima and Hayden. The City supplies trash bags, gloves and safety vests, and we spent about an hour and a half helping to keep Scottsdale beautiful. The cleanup starts at 8:00 AM, and we meet at Randy’s Restaurant in the shopping center on the northwest corner of Chaparral and Hayden at 7:00 AM for a no host breakfast. I have a signup sheet here, of course.

We just had an election, but preparation by candidates for the 2018 election is already beginning. Dave Schweikert is running for reelection as our representative in Congressional District 6.  In Arizona, to be on the ballot requires a number of signatures on a Nomination Petition. The number for 2018 will change a little, but in 2016, a minimum of 1,622 signatures was needed. If you live in District 6, are registered as a Republican or as an independent or with no party preference, you can sign the petition. We have petitions available for signature tonight.

On to City Council items.  As many of you know, I am on the Bond Oversight Committee. We are tasked with keeping an eye on the spending approved in our last bond election for fire stations and for road repaving. Our next meeting is later this month, but I do have one update. One of the projects is the relocation of the fire station on McDonald and 73rd Street. The new location selected is on Indian Bend, just west of Pima. The owner of the property objected to the sale, the City invoked eminent domain, the court agreed, the City had the property appraised and deposited the appraised value in an escrow account and took over the property and began the planning and construction process. The owner then sued. I am told that

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City Council & Scottsdale Unified School District Report March 16

by Doug Reed

First, I have a couple on non-City Council items:

We just had an election, but preparation by candidates for the 2018 election is already beginning. Dave Schweikert is running for reelection as our representative in Congressional District 6. By the way, Dave will be our speaker at next month’s Tea Party meeting.  In Arizona, to be on the ballot requires a number of signatures on a Nomination Petition. The number for 2018 will change a little, but in 2016, a minimum of 1,622 signatures was needed. If you live in District 6, are registered as a Republican or as an independent or with no party preference, you can sign the petition. We have petitions available for signature tonight.

Also, we have our twice yearly Adopt-A-Road event coming up next month-April 22nd. For the past several years, Tea Party Scottsdale has “adopted” Chaparral Road between Pima and Hayden. The City supplies trash bags, gloves and safety vests, and we spend about an hour and a half helping to keep Scottsdale beautiful. The cleanup starts at 8:AM, and we meet at Randy’s Restaurant in the shopping center on the northwest corner of Chaparral and Hayden at 7:00 AM for a no host breakfast. Of course, I have a sign up sheet here.

Pam Kirby, Scottsdale Unified School Board member, is not able to be here tonight-she has a school board meeting-so she sent an update for me to share:

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Doug Reed's Update on the Scottsdale City Council, January 20, 2017

Scottsdale is again offering a program called “Scottsdale City Government 101.” It is a free program consisting of a series of meetings summarizing how the various departments of our city government function. There will be a series of 8 weekly sessions beginning this March running from noon until 2:00 on Thursdays at 7506 E Indian School Road. Free food is included. If you are interested, please see me after the meeting.

We finally have a new City Manager-Jim Thompson, the former City Manager of Casa Grande. Among the urgent issues he will face: Downtown parking (lack thereof) due to explosive growth; Need for additional fire and police services in South Scottsdale, again due to rapid growth; Additional investment in infrastructure which has been neglected for several years.

As of fiscal year end 2016, the City had $34 million in its Unreserved Fund Balance, an increase of $4 million over the projected amount. This is money the City has collected, but has not yet figured out how to spend. If you have any thoughts, let the City Council know.

 SHORT TERM RENTALS-Our state legislature, in May of this year, enacted a bill which states, in part “A city or town may not restrict the use of or regulate vacation or short term rentals…”. Essentially, cities cannot place zoning restrictions on short term rentals which are 

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Succinct Statement on Why "No DDC" on our Preserve!

Great logical argument for placement of the DDC on an adjacent location.

Neither the DDCS or the City Council Supporters will tell us the truth about why they insist on forcing this on Scottsdale voters against all logic, the City Charter and the majority of voters.

If they succeed - who is willing to run for Council in 2018 to replace the current sycophants.

by Howard Myers

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My Turn: More thoughts on 'keeping' Scottsdale special by Bob Littlefield

I have used the slogan “Keep Scottsdale Special” in several of my political campaigns, including my recent unsuccessful run for mayor earlier this year. In fact, I literally own that name, having registered it as a trade name and as a web address. So, I was obviously interested to see architect Vern Swaback’s recent column mocking the very idea of “keeping” Scottsdale special.

Bob Littlefield

Sadly, his column repeats for the umpteenth time two falsehoods some members of the development community have been using for years to promote bad projects in Scottsdale.

It's not about opposition to change

The first of these falsehoods is that those of us who want to keep Scottsdale the special place it is are merely “opposed to change.” If I had a nickel for every time I have heard this nonsense during the 20 years I have been involved in Scottsdale development issues (including 12 years as a City Councilman) I could be retired on the Riviera by now!

I have to laugh at the idea that I of all people am “opposed to change.” During my 25 years in the computer industry I experienced – and embraced – more change than most people see in a lifetime. But that experience taught me not all change is good, and not every new idea qualifies as progress.

Over the last 60 years Scottsdale has indeed had many bold, visionary ideas such as 

 

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Korte eyes convergence of opposing views at Scottsdale ‘Community Conversation’

Scottsdale Councilwoman Virginia Korte has a dangerously productive idea: put people with opposing views on public topics in one place at the same time and respectfully hash out differences to find the best consensus for the community of Scottsdale.

“Through the last several years serving on the city council, what I believe is the basic fundamental issue for Scottsdale is that we lack a true vision,” she said in a Nov. 29 interview.She is calling it a “Community Conversation.”

“What do people want for the future of Scottsdale? What does 2050 look like?”

Virginia Korte

Councilwoman Korte contends the community of Scottsdale cannot stall or let opposing views stop good ideas from coming to fruition or a lack of opposing views allowing bad ideas to become realities.

“We need to have a conversation of opposing views on ‘this would work or why it wouldn’t,’” she said. “We can’t go backwards.”

For one day, she wants community members — elected, executive and everyday Joes — to come together to help local leaders build a vision the city of Scottsdale ought to be pursuing.

“Putting horse troughs in front of downtown stores 

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Doug Reed's Scottsdale City Council Report, November 17, 2016

unspecified.jpgNovember 17, 2016

ELECTION RESULTS-Scottsdale residents voted as if they were satisfied with the direction of the city. All four incumbents were reelected. Out of 100,000 votes cast, Mayor Jim Lane beat challenger Bob Littlefield by almost a 2:1 margin. For the City Council, Suzanne Klapp was the number 1 vote getter, followed by Virginia Korte and Guy Phillips. The three candidates were separated by only 2300 votes. Challenger Dan Schweiker placed fourth, and would have needed about 4,000 more votes to come in third.
Proposition 490, correcting outdated Charter language reflecting when elections are held and when Mayor and Councilmember terms begin passed easily.

Switching for a moment to the State elections, the Arizona Minimum Wage proposition passed 58% to 42%.  Arizona’s current minimum wage is $8.05. It will increase January 1, 2017 to

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Doug Reed's Update on the Scottsdale City Council October, 2016

October 19 TPS

In the upcoming election, we have two candidates running for Mayor and four candidates running for the three City Council positions. For Mayor, Jim Lane is the incumbent and Bob Littlefield is the challenger. For City Council, Suzanne Klapp, Virginia Korte and Guy Phillips are the incumbents, and Dan Schweiker is the challenger. I picked out four issues that seem to dominate and here are the candidate’s positions:

DENSITY & HEIGHT
Lane, Klapp, Korte and Schweiker are generally supportive of denser and taller developments.
Bob Littlefield and Phillips are generally against excessive density and height

LIGHT RAIL
 Against light rail-Lane, Bob Littlefield and Phillips are against. Littlefield and Phillips are vehemently against, Lane a little less vehemently.
Klapp is against, but supports some form of high capacity transit.
Korte wants light rail.
Schweiker wants to consider all options.

DESERT DISCOVERY CENTER
Phillips is absolutely 

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September 19 SCC Study Session on Voting the DDC!

DDC_airial_view.jpgFrom Howard Myers - 

On September 19th, the city council will have a study session to decide what to do with the petition we submitted back in May that asks the council to require a public vote to put anything in the Preserve other than trails and trail heads, and to require a public vote to use ANY Preserve funds for anything other than land acquisition and building trails and trail heads.

Since this is a study session, the city council will not make any decision, rather they will direct staff on what to do with the petition. They will probably direct staff to do one of the following.

1.  Do nothing – let it die.

2. Come back with suggestions on how it could be implemented. – there are many possibilities here.

3. Come back with specific language for a change to the City Charter that would require a public vote to build anything in the Preserve or to use Preserve funds for anything other than land acquisition or building trails or minimal facilities for trail heads.

This last option is what we want them to do because once this requirement is in the City Charter, it can’t be changed without a public vote as all changes to the City Charter require a public vote so 4 members of the council can’t change it later on their own. The downside is 

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Claim: Scottsdale City Council in violation of City Charter

Scottsdale Independent, Sept 18, 2016

It is the position of the undersigned citizens of Scottsdale that the mayor and city council are currently in violation of The Scottsdale City Charter by misappropriating the $1.76 million of tax money to investigate the development of a facility that cannot be constructed without the consent of two-thirds of the city council and a majority of the voters.

Mike Norton

Mike Norton

The Scottsdale City Charter, as amended by Article VIII on July 12, 1999 Sec. 8 “Preserve Land Designation” gives the city “… power to cause land to be left in its natural condition.”

The city council, alone, may not alter the natural condition without consent of the voters except as provided in Sec. 11, which limits the removal of the designation to less than 1 acre no more than six times a year. It is likely that contiguous parcels would violate the intent & spirit of the Charter.

Presumably, the city council complied with this provision in the construction of the trailhead facilities; however, it is unclear if the parking lot areas were constructed in compliance.

The Desert Discovery Center, currently contemplated, could not be constructed without an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the Council and “submitted by the council to the electors and approved by vote of the majority of votes cast as the election”. Sec. 11. supra.

Despite the express language of the Charter, on 

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