Tea Party of Scottsdale, AZ
Our mission is to attract, educate, organize, and mobilize our fellow citizens to secure public policy consistent with our three core values: Personal Freedom, Economic Freedom and a Debt-Free Future


 

 

Tea Party Scottsdale Taxed Enough Already


RNC Resolution Approved Regulation Freedom Amendment!

This morning the Republican National Committee, meeting in Hollywood Florida, unanimously passed a Resolution authored by National Committee Woman Melody Potter of West Virginia in support of the Regulation Freedom Amendment to require that Congress approve major new federal regulations be approved by Congress.

The RNC joins Presidential candidate Ted Cruz who has formally  endorsed the Regulation Freedom Amendment and  Presidential candidate John Kasich who praised the Amendment  at an RNC reception on Wednesday telling us "I'm for it!" 

More than 900 state legislators and 5 governors also support the Regulation Freedom Amendment.

If you have questions or would like to become more involved in this rapidly growing effort to end "regulation without representation" please contact me.

Roman Buhler, Director, The Madison Coalition

202 255 5000  www.RegulationFreedom.Org

 

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A Report from an Experienced Colorado Delegate - No Cheating Involved!

 PLEASE, before you believe CO system is cheating, listen to a young delegate explain the system. This has nothing to do with the candidates. Please educate yourselves before you make accusations. I am a precinct Committee woman and voted for the delegate in my precinct that most reflected my values. Anyone can be elected as a precinct committeeman in fact we probably have 6 or 7 positions that are not filled in LD23!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QpKAU60Wigs&feature=youtu.be

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Obama's Greatest Triumph

Daniel_Henninger.jpegHe is six months away from destroying both the Republican Party and Reagan’s legacy.

 DANIEL HENNINGER, WSJ March 30, 2016 

Barack Obama will retire a happy man. He is now close to destroying his political enemies—the Republican Party, the American conservative movement and the public-policy legacy of Ronald Reagan.

Today, the last men standing amidst the debris of the Republican presidential competition are Donald Trump, a political independent who is using the Republican Party like an Uber car; Ted Cruz, who used the Republican Party as a footstool; and John Kasich, a remnant of the Reagan revolution, who is being told by Republicans to quit.

History may quibble, but this death-spiral began with Barack Obama’s health-care summit at Blair House on Feb. 25, 2010. For a day, Republicans gave detailed policy critiques of the proposed Affordable Care Act. When it was over, the Democrats, including Mr. Obama, said they had heard nothing new.

That meeting was the last good-faith event in the Obama presidency. Barack Obama killed 

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If Only Gun Control Worked, Every Pro-Gun Group Wishes It Did

alan_korwin.jpegAlan Korwin, Townhall, March 31

Gun control won’t disarm the Syrian rebels. Or the Syrian Army. It can’t disarm the Russians, or the Kurds, or any of the combatants in the Middle East. If only gun control (and explosives-control laws!) could disarm the European jihadis, currently under some of the strictest gun- and crime-control laws in the civilized world. That way, the murderous factions over there could stop murdering everyone. But it just doesn’t work, doggone it.

This is the great flaw with law. It doesn’t work. It gives you legal options after

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Common Sense: Tyranny (1776)

Common_Sense.jpgAccording to some historians, Thomas Paine’s, Common Sense, was the most influential pamphlet in American history.  Widely popular, it sold over 120,000 copies in the first three months of publication and 500,000 copies by the end of the Revolution.

“… Britain is the parent country, say some.  Then the more shame upon her conduct.  Even brutes do not devour their young, nor savages make war upon their families…  Europe, and not England, is the parent country of America. This new World 

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How Christianity changed the world — and how its decline impacts America

Len Munsil, AZ I see it, AZ Republic, March 26, 2016

Viewpoints: What replaces love, faith and self-control if Christianity continues its decline in America?

he great Christian thinker and writer C.S. Lewis, author of "Mere Christianity" and "The Chronicles of Narnia," also wrote an engaging little book called "The Abolition of Man: How Education Develops Man’s Sense of Morality."

I serve as president of a Christian university in an increasingly post-Christian culture. So I recognize Lewis’ prophetic wisdom as I consider what happens when generations of young people are educated in a way that rejects the objective truth claims of Christianity — the very truths that were foundational to the formation of our civilization.

Today we are living in a reality TV world where popular culture and politics seem to be dominated by cruel, hateful, confrontational, coarse, narcissistic, greedy, selfish and vulgar messages, leading to a stressed out, cynical, depressed and discouraged citizenry.

An antidote to our stressed out, greedy world

By contrast, Christian believers who grow in their faith pursue characteristics and virtues that bring great benefit to society such as “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.” (Galatians 5:22-23).

A recent Pew Research study shows Christians are still a majority in America, but 

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March 17 TPS General Meeting

Rick_Gutridge.jpeg

Great March 17 Meeting  with both Rick Gutridgecommunity activist,  and Steve ChucriMaricopa County Supervisor, Dist 2, on government reform

Steve_Chucri.jpeg

 April 21 - next meeting - same time, same place

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Donald Trump, Celebrity Politician

donald_trump.jpegDaniel Boorstin’s 1961 book about ‘pseudo-events’ helps explain the New Yorker’s rise.

 GORDON CROVITZ, WSJ, March 13, 2016

Americans are divided between those wondering how Donald Trumpcould possibly be a leading presidential candidate and those wondering how others can wonder why. Both camps would benefit from Daniel Boorstin’s “The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America,” which in 1961 explained the Trump candidacy.

Writing the year after the first televised presidential debate, between JFK and Nixon, Boorstin predicted that new media technologies would transform politics—and not for the better. He coined “pseudo-event” to describe photo-ops, presidential debates and other staged events whose relationship to the “underlying reality of the situation is ambiguous.” Today he might have included provocative social-media posts.

“Pseudo-events thus lead to emphasis on pseudo-qualifications,” he wrote. “If we test presidential candidates by talents 

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Common Sense: Monarchy (1776)

Common_Sense.jpegIn 1776, many colonists still considered themselves British Citizens.  Thomas Paine’s pamphlet, Common Sense, helped immensely to transition the minds of the people to consider Independence.  In this portion of Common Sense, Paine wrote a very unflattering history of monarchical governments.

“… Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil…  Wherefore, security being the true design and end of government, it unanswerably follows that whatever form thereof appears most likely to ensure it to us, with the least expense and greatest benefit, is preferable to all others.

… There is something exceedingly ridiculous in the 

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Trump and the Rise of the Unprotected

Trump_rally.jpgWhy political professionals are struggling to make sense of the world they created

by Peggy Noonan, WSJ, February 25, 2016

We’re in a funny moment. Those who do politics for a living, some of them quite brilliant, are struggling to comprehend the central fact of the Republican primary race, while regular people have already absorbed what has happened and is happening. Journalists and politicos have been sharing schemes for how Marco parlays a victory out of winning nowhere, or Ted roars back, or Kasich has to finish second in Ohio. But in my experience any nonpolitical person on the street, when asked who will win, not only knows but gets a look as if you’re teasing him. Trump, they say.

I had such a conversation again Tuesday with a friend who repairs shoes in a shop on Lexington Avenue. Jimmy asked me, conversationally, what was going to happen. I deflected and asked who he thinks is going to win. “Troomp!” He’s a very nice man, an elderly, old-school Italian-American, but I saw impatience flick across his face: Aren’t you supposed to know these things?

In America now only normal people are capable of seeing the obvious.

But actually that’s been true for a while, and 

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